I’ve been spoiled. I rarely, if ever, order steak at a restaurant (with the exception of Outback Steakhouse who has awesome steaks) because I’m afraid it won’t be as good as the ones I grill at home.

In fact, the first weekend I returned home from college as a freshman, my only request for meals was steak with this marinade and a baked potato.

So, for a good part of the last 10 or 12 years, I’ve been eating steak that’s been marinated in this fabulous marinade! It’s a recipe that my mom got at a Weight Watchers meeting many moons ago.

I know it might sound like soy sauce, honey, garlic, and scallions would produce an Asian-flavored marinade but this isn’t the case at all. The soy sauce flavor is dramatically toned down by the honey, water, and oil during the marinating time and all of the flavors come together beautifully.

In my own humble [but not often subtle] opinion, if you’re going to grill a steak, you MUST have some sort of potato on the side.

Mashed, smashed, hasselbacked, crashed, scalloped, au gratin, baked…It doesn’t matter what variety you choose as long as it’s there!

Twice baked potatoes are a real treat and last night, I decided that I deserved that treat.

As I was waiting for Kyle to return home from a side job, I got peckish (read: starving).

It was nearing 8:00 and my tummy needed some dinner!

I poked around the pantry and then the fridge for something to nibble on and decided to break out the gouda cheese that had been calling my name for the past week.

It’s been ages since I’ve had gouda and HOLY MOLY!!

My dear Gouda: where have you been all this time?? I had forgotten how much I love you!

And while nibbling away like a little mouse, I decided on the spot that my regular baked potatoes would become these Gouda twice-baked potatoes.

Overall, this really was one of the best meals I’ve had/made in a while.

The rib-eye was just perfect, I didn’t over-grill the steak (for once), the marinade was of course, fantastic, and the twice baked potato was well, out of this world!

I normally use a flank steak for this honey soy marinated flank steak recipe but for whatever reason, my grocery store was sold out of flank steak the day I was buying it for this recipe. The rib-eye stand-in I bought instead was a great alternative though!

The flavor of the gouda really came through and refined the consistency of the potato stuffing as it melted throughout.

Baked potatoes are easy enough to make for these gouda twice baked potatoes but I highly recommend you try my very VERY favorite way to bake the best baked potato. You won’t regret it!!

I’m not one to repeat meals from week to week, but since I’m having trouble thinking about much else as I prepare my menu for next week, I might just have to.

Honey Soy Marinated Flank Steak

Honey Soy Marinated Flank Steak

Yield: 4 servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 12 minutes
Marinating Time: 2 hours
Total Time: 2 hours 22 minutes

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup reduce-sodium soy sauce
  • ¼ cup canola oil (I use extra virgin olive oil)
  • ¼ cup honey
  • ¼ cup water
  • 3 scallions, chopped (I use 1 tbsp dried onion flakes)
  • 3-4 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
  • 18 oz flank steak

Instructions

  1. Combine all ingredients except the steak in a large zip-top bag. Close the zipper and squeeze ingredients to combine, making sure to incorporate the honey.
  2. Add the steak to the bag and release as much air as possible before closing the zipper.
  3. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours or overnight, remembering to turn the bag over every few hours.
  4. Heat a grill high heat, and grill the steak about 7 minutes per side for medium rare. Allow the steak to rest for 5 minutes before slicing and serving.

Notes

When I first posted this recipe in 2007, it was 7 WeightWatchers Points. I do not know how to convert those points to the modern-day Points system (I don't even know what it is!) so if you want to do this, go for it!

 

Gouda Twice Baked Potatoes

Gouda Twice Baked Potatoes

Yield: 4 servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 55 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 5 minutes

These gouda twice baked potatoes are an easy and family-friendly side dish for steak, burgers, chicken, or pork. And the recipe below is easy to scale up or down, depending on how many people you need to feed!

Ingredients

  • 2 large Russet or Idaho potatoes (10-12 oz each)
  • ½ cup plus 4 tbsp shredded gouda cheese (about 6 oz)
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 2-3 tbsp reduced-fat sour cream
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400° F.
  2. Wash and stick potatoes with a fork a couple of times.* To cut down on oven cooking time, I pre-cook the potatoes in the microwave oven for about 7 minutes on high - depending on weight - then transfer them to the oven for 45 minutes, turning over once. The potatoes should be soft on the inside but the skin should be almost crispy. You can also skip the microwave stage and bake potatoes for 45 minutes then turn over and bake for an additional 30 minutes.
  3. Remove potatoes from oven and with a sharp knife, slice the potatoes in half lengthwise. Scoop out potato into a medium bowl, being careful not to push through the skin and leaving enough potato so that the skin doesn't become floppy.
  4. Add only ½ cup gouda and all remaining ingredients to the bowl and stir until mixture becomes creamy - do not over stir. If mixture is too stiff, add a little more sour cream or a dash of milk.
  5. With a spoon, carefully refill potato skins with potato mixture. Sprinkle each potato with 1 tbsp remaining shredded gouda.
  6. Place potatoes on a baking sheet and return to hot oven. Bake for an additional 10 minutes then turn the broiler on for 2 minutes to melt and slightly brown cheese topping.

Notes

*You can bake these potatoes as directed in my instructions above or see how I now bake the best baked potatoes ever right here.

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