Tiramisu Ice Cream

It’s taken me at least a month to finally gather my thoughts for this particular post.  And I’m sorry about that because this tiramisu ice cream is rather outstanding and you really should try it soon, especially if you’re up for a little boozy kick at the end of a long, super hot day.  You see, from the moment I made this ice cream, all I could think about was my grandma.  I put down some thoughts about her last year, about my grief at the end of her life; she passed away just a few hours after I published that post.  It’s been a long year and I’ve done a lot of reflecting, remembering…and there’s still a good amount of guilt happening, but moreso, so many great memories I’ve pulled up from the recesses of my brain.

Tiramisu Ice Cream

She would have loved this ice cream, both for the simple fact that it was ice cream, but also because of the booze.  Gramma was a notorious baker in that she put booze in nearly every.single dessert she made and in turn, ruined nearly every.single dessert she made.  I swear she thought she was Julia Child.  As a kid, it wasn’t so funny when you stuffed a forkful of chocolate cake with cherry filling into your mouth and were all but knocked over with the flavor of brandy.  An inedible slice of cake.  Talk about a cruel joke.  As an teenager, it got to be a running joke amongst my brother, cousins and I: which liqueur would Gramma wreck her dessert with tonight?  This was all in good fun, of course, though we later found out that she even added brandy to the onion soup mix dip she used to make, which was understandably pretty terrible as well.  Who does that??

Tiramisu Ice Cream

Gramma also always had ice cream in the freezer and Magic Shell in the cabinet.  I suspect my mom’s ice cream sweet tooth is a result of this.  They both had/have a purposeful habit of leaving the ice cream on the counter for a few minutes after returning from the grocery store so that they could spoon off the softened edges around the carton – it was the best part.  Now, I didn’t grow up in a very Italian family, though my dad is 100%, and Gramma wasn’t Italian at all.  And I don’t actually remember her ever making tiramisu but she would have flipped over this tiramisu ice cream.

Tiramisu Ice Cream

Even right from the freezer, its texture is smooth and rich, almost as if it were softened from sitting on the counter.  An espresso-mascarpone base with a noticeable bit of Kahula and brandy whipped up in a food processor replaces an egg yolk custard base in this recipe and amazingly, none of the creaminess of a custard ice cream is lost here.  So it’s a quick, no-cook ice cream base that will last a couple of days in the fridge if you’re not ready to churn right away.  There is a layer of mocha fudge ripple that you’ll swirl around the freshly churned ice cream which kind of sets off the whole experience.  Needless to say, Kyle and I both adored this ice cream.  The booze adds a little oomph and left me feeling like we should have been having dessert at an outdoor café under the stars.  Or better yet, on the screened-in porch at Gramma’s where we could always find her reading or napping on a hot summer afternoon with the bay breeze blowing in.  The greatest memories never fade.

Tiramisu Ice Cream

Yield: about 1 ¼ quarts

If you want to skip the booze, increase the espresso powder to 1 teaspoon or use ¼ cup cold strongly brewed coffee or espresso. The ice cream will be a bit on the harder side because alcohol doesn't freeze solid and therefore it helps to keep the ice cream on the softer side.

Ingredients

    For the ice cream:
  • 16 oz mascarpone cheese
  • 1 cup half-and-half
  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • ½ tsp instant espresso powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • ¼ cup Kahula or other coffee-flavored liqueur
  • 3 tbsp brandy or dark rum
  • Mocha Fudge Ripple (recipe follows)
  • For the mocha fudge ripple:
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 1/3 cup light corn syrup
  • ½ cup strongly brewed coffee or 2 tsp instant espresso powder
  • 6 tbsp Dutch-processed cocoa powder
  • ½ tsp pure vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. To make the ice cream: Add the mascarpone, half-and-half, sugar, espresso powder, salt, Kahula, and brandy or rum to a food processor. Puree until well-combined, smooth, and the sugar is dissolved. Transfer to a resealable container and chill thoroughly in the refrigerator, at least 6 hours. Freeze the ice cream base in an ice cream maker according to manufacturer's instructions.
  2. To make the mocha fudge ripple: Whisk the sugar, corn syrup, coffee, and cocoa powder together gently in a small saucepan. Bring the mixture to a low boil over medium heat, whisking constantly. Cook for 1 minute. Remove the saucepan from the heat and stir in the vanilla extract. Allow to cool completely then transfer the ripple to a resealable container and chill thoroughly - at least 6 hours.
  3. To assemble: Layer the freshly churned ice cream with half of the mocha fudge ripple in two layers in a 2 quart container. The remainder of the ripple can be saved for another ice cream (like tin roof) or used as an ice cream topping. Swirl a knife quickly around the ice cream. Freeze the ice cream completely before serving - it will need at least 4 hours.

Source

source: adapted from The Perfect Scoop by David Lebovitz

http://www.smells-like-home.com/2013/07/tiramisu-ice-cream/

we love to see what you make!

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@smellslikehomeblog
  • Warm Vanilla Sugar
    July 19, 2013 at 7:19 AM

    I’m definitely up for a boozy kick like this for the weekend! Awesome recipe!

  • Steph
    July 19, 2013 at 9:36 AM

    No need to even scoop mine in to a bowl. I’ll just eat it straight from the container!

    • taraliptak
      July 19, 2013 at 11:03 AM

      Yep, we basically did!

  • Whitney Society
    July 19, 2013 at 9:49 AM

    I will definitely want to inclue the booze! Thanks!

  • July 19, 2013 at 11:15 AM

    what an incredible ice cream! sounds like your grandma was quite a woman. 🙂

  • Honeybird @ Keukensprookjes
    July 20, 2013 at 5:30 AM

    It looks and sounds really good! My sister is soo gonna love this 🙂

  • PCB
    July 29, 2013 at 10:21 PM

    So I may be missing something – after preparing the ingredients for the ice cream by mixing in the blender, you let it freeze for 6 hours in a separate container, or do you go ahead and put it in your pre-frozen base of your ice cream maker to start the churning process? I guess I’m not clear on when the churning part is supposed to happen…

    • taraliptak
      July 30, 2013 at 8:45 AM

      I’m sorry if I was unclear. Blend everything together in the food processor or blender and chill the mixture (I call it the ice cream base) in a tightly covered bowl in the fridge for 6+ hours. Then transfer the base to the bowl of your ice cream maker, which should have been kept in the freezer for at least 36 hours to ensure the ice cream will freeze/churn properly. Freeze/churn the base in the ice cream maker according to the instructions for your equipment. I hope this helps but let me know if you have more questions.

  • taraliptak
    April 17, 2014 at 10:53 AM

    I’m sorry, I don’t know.

  • Fiona Parker-Cole
    June 23, 2015 at 5:16 AM

    yum! This is the best ice cream I have eaten outside of Italy. Thank youXXXX

  • Mary Finn
    July 18, 2015 at 12:59 PM

    I like that she shows respect for grandma. I will probably never make this dish, but we all had the wild, untameable gypsy aunt, mom or granny, at least if we were lucky….

  • Carolyn Mustopa
    July 25, 2015 at 9:54 AM

    My mixture curdled terribly! Any idea what might have happened?

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